Project Profile

Mayogo NT | Mayogo

Mayogo 1
Mayogo 2

The Mayogo people live in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire). The Mayogo society is patriarchal and characterized by subsistence farming. Most people have their own gardens, and crops grown include manioc, rice, maize, beans and groundnuts. They also grow bananas, pineapples, pawpaw, mangos and avocados. The Magoyo are skilled at crafts, including pottery, furniture making and mat making.

Mission organizations began work with the Mayogo people after about 1913. Catholic missionaries have also worked in this area and the church is well established. About 90% of Mayogo are nominally Christian, with about 60% Catholic. The remaining 10% are animistic and practice African traditional religion. In recent years, sects have begun to appear.

The team of Congolese project workers has shown considerable commitment to the translation and literacy task even during the hardships of war. When the expatriate translators were evacuated because of the civil war, the Mayogo translators continued to translate the Gospel of Luke and traveled hundreds of miles to Uganda in order to have their translated work checked by an experienced consultant. The book of Luke has been published.

News from the Field
  • Sep19

    Mayogo of DRC

    The Mayogo speakers live in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire). The Mayogo society is patriarchal and characterized by subsistence farming. About 90% of Mayogo are nominally Christian. The remaining 10% are animistic and practice African traditional religion. In recent years, sects have begun to appear.

    Continue Reading

  • Apr14

    Mayogo of DRC

    100,000 Mayogo speakers live in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire). The Mayogo society is patriarchal and characterized by subsistence farming. About 90% of Mayogo are nominally Christian, with about 60% Catholic. The remaining 10% are animistic and practice African traditional religion. In recent years, sects have begun to appear. The team of Congolese project workers has shown considerable commitment to the translation and literacy task even during the hardships of war.

    Continue Reading

 

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